Septuagint Bibliography: Search Results

Your search returned 599 matches.
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ID:61
Author:Brown, William P.
Year:1998
Title:A Royal Performance: Critical Notes on Psalm 110:3ag-b
Pages:93-96
Journal:Journal of Biblical Literature
Volume:117
Issue:1
Abstract:Provides a new reading of Ps 110:3 that retains the integrity of the consonantal text of the MT, while taking seriously other key witnesses, particularly the LXX. The resulting translation conveys a sense of directed movement: In holy splendor, out of the womb, towards the dawn go forth! / Like (the) dew, I have begotten you. The reference is apparently to a rite of passage in a royal liturgy pronounced by an oracle giver. It is not clear precisely what womb, dawn, and dew might signify. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Textual Criticism--Psalms; Translating

ID:62
Author:Brown, William P.
Year:1993
Title:Structure, role, and ideology in the Hebrew and Greek texts of Genesis 1:1-2:3
Place:Atlanta, Ga.
Publisher:Scholars Press
Keywords:Textual Criticism; Theology

ID:63
Author:Buckwalter, H. Douglas
Year:1996
Title:Luke as Writer of Sacred History
Pages:86-99
Journal:Evangelical Journal
Volume:14
Issue:2
Abstract:Luke indicates that he is writing about events which have recently come to fulfillment (Luke 1:1) and which are of value to Christian faith (Luke 1:3-4). Conscious linking with the OT raises the possibility that Luke deliberately writes his account of the coming of Jesus as of a piece with the OT. How thoroughly he has shaped his writing along this line needs elaboration: (1) fulfillment of OT promises and prophecies; (2) OT continuum of pious priestly service, historical events and personalities; (3) LXX language and style; (4) resumption of divine communication; (5) OT typology and parallels. We come closest to Luke's thinking of redemptive history when we read his writings as an extension of the story of God's redemptive activity in the. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:LXX in NT

ID:64
Author:Burggraff, David L.
Year:1996
Title:Paradigm Shift: Translations in Transition - We've Been Here Before
Pages:105-15
Journal:Calvary Baptist Theol Journal
Volume:12(1-2
Abstract:Disagreements and correspondence between Jerome and Augustine in the 4th century parallel present day discussions concerning translation. Augustine favored the Old Italian and reacted to Jerome's Vulgate, even favoring the LXX to Hebrew OT texts. Through numerous letters, they learned not to attack each other but to stimulate each other unto truth. Their differences over translations did not prevent them from agreeing on true doctrine, as evident in their opposition to the heresy of Pelagianism. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Translating

ID:65
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1996
Title:Exegetical Variants in the LXX of Exodus. An Evaluation
Pages:35-58
Journal:Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages
Volume:22
Issue:1
Abstract:There are many scholars who have asserted that similarities between the Jewish Midrash (Mekilta) and the Septuagint of Exodus are evidence of halakhic exegesis by the Greek translator. A close scrutiny of all available textual material will reveal that this is indeed true in many cases. Also, and more importantly, the evidence shows that readings presupposed by the body commentary of the Midrash and its agreement by readings of the Septuagint betray the existence of different textual Vorlagen. This confirms the results of previous studies in Jewish citation literature that have suggested that even though lemmata of midrashic works were brought into line with the accepted text, the commentary sections themselves still may contain alternative readings that betray different Vorlagen. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:66
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1997
Title:Inside and Outside the Camp: The Halakhic Background to Changes in the Septuagint Leviticus, with Reference to Two Qumran Manuscripts
Pages:151-62
Journal:Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages
Volume:23
Issue:2
Abstract:By considering the data presented by the total evidence from Qumran, one cannot simply put down additions or omissions of a text to haplography due to homoioarchton, for instance. An addition appearing in a number of texts was deliberate, motivated by exegetical considerations apparent also in the Jewish commentaries. A question that arises from this particular addition is whether the Qumran, Alexandrian and Samaritan communities could have regarded themselves as ideal communities true to the period in the desert vis-a-vis mainstream (Pharisaic) Judaism in Jerusalem during the late Second Temple period. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:67
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1997
Title:Inspiration and the Texts of the Bible
Pages:393-406
Journal:Hervormde Teologiese Stud
Volume:53(1-2
Abstract:Explores what the inspired text of the OT was as it existed for the NT authors, particularly for the author of Hebrews. There was, at the time, more than one inspired text, among these were the LXX and the MT, to name but two. The latter eventually gained ascendancy which is why it forms the basis of our translated OT today. But what do we make of that other text that was the inspired Bible to the early church, especially the writer of Hebrews, who ignored the MT? Looks at suggestions for a doctrine of inspiration that keeps up with the facts of Scripture. Offers a bibliographic study of recent developments in textual research following discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Bible of the church

ID:68
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1997
Title:Jewish Commentaries and the Septuagint
Pages:250-61
Journal:Journal of Jewish Studies
Volume:48
Issue:2
Abstract:Draws a comparison between two sources of Jewish exegesis on the book of Exodus which have their roots in the Second Temple period, the Septuagint and Mekilta de Rabbi Ishmael. By taking a closer look at this text base in relation to the LXX, the LXX and the Mekilta contain examples of early and typically Jewish exegesis. Classifies the types of agreement that exist between these two documents. The textual examples appear according to categories of interpretation, ranging from ordinary harmonization to more advanced halakhic exegesis. Includes the Versions and Qumran for a useful synopsis. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:69
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1993
Title:Micah 7:6 in the Old Testament Versions
Pages:159-68
Journal:Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages
Volume:19
Abstract:Investigates Mic 7:6 and its rendition in the versions (LXX, Peshitta, Targum) and claims that the literary growth of this passage evidenced in some of these sources holds important implications for both NT and Rabbinic studies. Suggests that the evolution in this regard had taken place from Micah in the MT/LXX most probably via the Targum, to the NT (Matt 10:35/Luke 12:53) and the Mishnah (Sotah 9:15). (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:70
Author:Büchner, Dirk L.
Year:1997
Title:On the relationship between Mekhilta de Rabbi Ishmael and Septuagint Exodus 12-23
Collection Title:IX Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Editor:Taylor, Bernard A.
Place:Atlanta
Publisher:Scholars Press
Pages:403-20
Keywords:Exegetical Translation; Pentateuch


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