Septuagint Bibliography: Search Results

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ID:191
Author:Gentry, P.J.
Year:2001
Title:The Greek Psalter and the kaige Tradition: Methodological Questions
Collection Title:The Old Greek Psalter: Studies in Honour of Albert Pietersma
Editor:Hiebert, Robert J.V.; Cox, Claude E.; Gentry, P.J.
Place:Sheffield
Publisher:Sheffield Academic Press
Pages:74-97
Series:Journal for the Study of the Old Testament. Supplement Series 332
Keywords:Psalms; translation technique, revision

ID:192
Author:Gentry, Peter John
Year:1995
Title:The asterisked materials in the Greek Job
Place:Atlanta, Ga.
Publisher:Scholars Press
Keywords:Textual Criticism

ID:193
Author:Gentry, Peter John
Year:1998
Title:The place of Theodotion-Job in the textual history of the Septuagint
Collection Title:Origen's Hexapla and fragments
Editor:Salvesen, A.
Place:Tübingen
Publisher:J.C.B. Mohr
Pages:199-230
Keywords:Textual Criticism

ID:194
Author:Giese, Ronald L., Jr.
Year:1993
Title:Compassion for the Lowly in Septuagint Proverbs
Pages:109-17
Journal:Journal for the Study of Pseudepigrapha
Volume:11
Abstract:The Septuagint translator(s) of Proverbs reveals a great compassion for the poor and lowly. This is accomplished by deliberate lexical alteration (Prov 10:15), supplying additional parts of speech (Prov 3:27), adding whole clauses (Prov 13:11, Prov 17:5, Prov 28:22), extending the intent of one clause into the next (Prov 22:9, Prov 14:21), and vocalizing consonants differently than intended by the Hebrew author (Prov 19:7). In all these instances the changes in the Greek reflect the translator's view of the poor and not a different Hebrew Vorlage from the MT. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:195
Author:Giese, Ronald L., Jr.
Year:1993
Title:Dualism in the LXX of Prov 2:17: A Case Study in the LXX as Revisionary Translation
Pages:289-95
Journal:Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Volume:36
Issue:3
Abstract:Study of this text reveals a pattern typical of the LXX of qualifying the Hebrew. Occasionally an LXX reading may reflect an alternative Hebrew vorlage but usually (as here) the alterations are tendentious. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:196
Author:Giese, Ronald L., Jr.
Year:1992
Title:Qualifying Wealth in the Septuagint of Proverbs
Pages:409-25
Journal:Journal of Biblical Literature
Volume:111
Issue:3
Abstract:Although the LXX Proverbs is a fairly accurate representation of the underlying Hebrew, the translator repeatedly alters proverbs concerning the economic and social benefits wisdom confers upon faithful Jews. Some alterations merely make the original sense more explicit. Others transform the verse entirely, generally to remove any misunderstanding: Wisdom produces wealth, but wealth does not always presume wisdom. Discusses at length 3:9; 10:22; 13:11; 14:23, 24; 17:8; 21:20; and 23:4. The most significant alterations lie in the area of psychological encouragement to the poor to remain within the Jewish tradition. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:197
Author:Giese, Ronald L., Jr.
Year:1992
Title:Strength through Wisdom and the Bee in LXX-Prov 6,8
Pages:404-11
Journal:Biblica
Volume:73
Issue:3
Abstract:Bees have symbolized organization, intelligence, and industry in a variety of classical literatures. But the bee is not praised in the Hebrew OT. It is, however, in one verse in the LXX Prov 6:8, for which there is no known Hebrew tradition. The translator borrowed a gnomic illustration to further not the urgency of the work ethic in the Hebrew context but his own association of wisdom, an invisible attribute readily available to all persons, with the visible attributes of material accumulation or social standing. There are, then, two methods to achieve fame and fortune. On the one hand disregard for righteousness will often result in worldly gain. The Hebrew text affirms that the pursuit of wisdom is not to be viewed as a self-impoverishing process, but rather one that will result in equal, even greater, and more secure advancement. The LXX has taken these two paths to prosperity and contrasted them to a greater extent than the Hebrew tradition, making more explicit the thought that the weak or poor wise person will actually supplant the rich yet ungodly. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:198
Author:Goldenberg, Robert
Year:1997
Title:The Septuagint Ban on Cursing the Gods
Pages:381-89
Journal:Journal for the Study of Judaism
Volume:28
Issue:4
Abstract:The Covenant Code (Exod 21-31) lays down the prohibition Do not curse elohim. This rule has almost invariably been taken to ban either blasphemy or insult to judges. But the LXX instructs Do not speak ill of gods. Philo and Josephus cite this LXX passage, but elsewhere speak harsh polemics against Gentile beliefs and practices. One wonders whether these citations were meant as more than wishful thinking or propaganda. The LXX presents here an early example of Jewish community-relations publicity, a short-lived project, probably centered in Alexandria, aimed at convincing Gentiles that Jews are friendly people who seek to get along with everyone and possibly at convincing Jews that they should indeed behave in this fashion. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:199
Author:Goldman, Yohanan A. P.
Year:1995
Title:Crispations theologiques et accidents textuels dans le TM de Jeremie 2 (Theological Considerations and Textual Accidents in the MT of Jer 2)
Pages:25-52
Journal:Biblica
Volume:76
Issue:1
Abstract:Theological considerations and textual accidents may have influenced the MT of Jer 2. Shows that the LXX version of Jeremiah should not be underestimated as a witness to the earliest available text, even where this Greek text itself witnesses to later reworking. Any conjecture in textual criticism is valid only insofar as it can explain the extant witnesses to a text, and the solutions proposed here suggest that it is possible to discern where MT has undergone modifications which have deformed the original meaning of some of the oracles. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Textual Criticism--Jeremiah

ID:200
Author:Gordon, Robert P.
Year:1992
Title:The problem of haplography in 1 and 2 Samuel
Collection Title:Septuagint, scrolls and cognate writings
Editor:Brooke, George J.; Lindars, Barnabas
Place:Atlanta
Publisher:Scholars Press
Pages:131-58
Keywords:Textual Criticism--Samuel


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