Septuagint Bibliography: Search Results

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ID:181
Author:Flint, Peter W.
Year:2000
Title:Variant Readings of the Dead Sea Psalms Scrolls against the Massoretic Text and the Septuagint Psalter
Collection Title:Der Septuaginta-Psalter und seine tochterübersetzungen
Editor:Aejmelaeus, Anneli; Quast, Udo
Place:Göttingen
Publisher:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Pages:337-65
Keywords:Psalms

ID:182
Year:2000
Collection Title:For a Later Generation: the Transformation of Tradition in Israel, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity
Editor:Argall, Randal A.; Bow, Beverly A.; Werline, Rodney A.
Place:Harrisburg, Pa.
Publisher:Trinity Press International
Keywords:

ID:183
Author:Fox, Michael V.
Year:1996
Title:The Strange Woman in Septuagint Proverbs
Pages:31-44
Journal:Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages
Volume:22
Issue:2
Abstract:The Septuagintal treatment of the Strange Woman in Proverbs allows insight into the early history of interpretation of Proverbs. Different compositional levels within the LXX, with their own approaches, can be discerned. While for the most part the LXX treats the figure as an actual adulteress, there are some indications of allegorical interpretations, particularly in Prov 9. The promiscuous woman was not simply identified with foreign wisdom. She was regarded as a multivalent symbol with the potential for application to a variety of inimical realities, including bad advice, folly as such, foreign doctrines, and alien cultures. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Exegetical Translation

ID:184
Author:Fraenkel, Detlef
Year:2000
Title:Hexapla-Probleme im Psalter
Collection Title:Der Septuaginta-Psalter und seine tochterübersetzungen
Editor:Aejmelaeus, Anneli; Quast, Udo
Place:Göttingen
Publisher:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Pages:309-22
Keywords:Psalms

ID:185
Author:Fraenkel, Detlef
Year:1995
Title:Übersetzungsnorm und literarische Gestaltung: Spuren individueller Übersetzungstechnik in Exodus 25FF + 35FF
Collection Title:VIII Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Editor:Greenspoon, Leonard; Munnich, O.
Place:Atlanta
Publisher:Scholars Press
Pages:73-87
Keywords:Translation Technique; Pentateuch

ID:186
Author:Francis, Giordano
Year:1997
Title:Being Children of the Resurrection: Ultimate Experience and Existence in Luke-Acts
Pages:3-22
Journal:Ultimate Reality and Meaning
Volume:20
Issue:1
Abstract:Luke retells the Jesus story; his opera (texts) need analysis as story and discourse. These books depict a God involved with his people. Considers the implied author, i.e., the self the real author presents to the reader and which can be constructed from the values, attitudes and hopes his narratives embody. We become aware of his world view by how he appeals to the implied reader, the one presupposed by the text itself. The image is the communication model: sender, message, receiver. Luke's use of the LXX is complementary to his handling of the temple and its synagogal extension as basic Jewish institutions and symbols. He shows that God acts through Jesus in accordance with the established procedures of his evolving relationship with Israel. The LXX and temple interpret the life, ministry, and destiny of Jesus and vice versa. Luke's narrative art and rhetoric blend the God imaged through these religious institutions with the story of Jesus. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:LXX in NT

ID:187
Author:Freund, Richard A.
Year:1990
Title:From Kings to Archons: Jewish Political Ethics and Kingship Passages in the LXX
Pages:58-72
Journal:Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament
Volume:4
Issue:2
Abstract:Addresses Jewish political ethics and differences between the kingship passages in MT and LXX versions including: (1) The Greek arch n is used by LXX (especially in the Pentateuch) to distinguish the future sovereign ruler of the Israelites; for non-Israelite kings, basil us is used. The MT version generally uses melech (king) and may indicate a political accommodation made by the LXX translator to the political reality of the times. (2) The political apologetic apparent in LXX is based in part upon the real state of the Jewish polity in the Hellenistic era and is reflected in other texts of the period. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Theology

ID:188
Author:Freund, Richard A.
Year:1991
Title:Lying and Deception in the Biblical and Post-Biblical Judaic Tradition
Pages:45-61
Journal:Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament
Volume:5
Issue:1
Abstract:Similar to the MT version of Genesis, the LXX and other Hellenistic Jewish literature present varying perspectives on lying and deception. The LXX accepts the existence of lying and deception by Patriarchs and only minimally downplays the majority of the lying and deception terminology. Philo has a different view, eliminating most of the lying and deception from his patriarchal figures and disassociating them from this behavior. Josephus represents middle ground; he does not idealize the Patriarchs and their lies nor include all the lies of Genesis. Many key deceptions and lies have been omitted or minimized in an attempt to present a more idealistic but still realistic picture of the Patriarchs and their families. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:

ID:189
Author:Fürst, Alfons
Year:1994
Title:Kürbis oder Efeu? Zur Ubersetzung von Jona 4:6 in der Septuaginta und bei Hieronymus
Pages:12-19
Journal:Biblische Notizen
Volume:72
Keywords:

ID:190
Author:Fürst, Alfons
Year:1994
Title:Veritas Latina. Augustins Haltung gegenuber Hieronymus' Bibelubersetzungen (Augustine's Attitude toward Jerome's Bible Translation)
Pages:105-26
Journal:Revue des Etudes Augustiniennes
Volume:40
Issue:1
Abstract:Offers an analysis of the passages of Augustine's letters 28,2 and 71, 3-6, in which Augustine formulates his objections to Jerome's Bible translations. Jerome translated the book of Job twice, once from the Greek, and once from the original Hebrew. Augustine suggested to Jerome that he should translate from the LXX. Augustine's concerns were pastoral; the LXX was the accepted church version. Jerome's concerns were critical. While praising Jerome's translations, Augustine suggests that he produce an accurate Latin translation from the LXX, since the existing Latin translations are unreliable. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Translation Base


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