Septuagint Bibliography: Search Results

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ID:161
Author:Dorival, Gilles
Year:1995
Title:Remarques sur l'originalité du livre grec des Nombres
Collection Title:VIII Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Editor:Greenspoon, Leonard J.; et al.
Place:Atlanta
Publisher:Scholars Press
Pages:89-107
Keywords:Literary study--Individual book--Numbers

ID:162
Year:2001
Collection Title:La double transmission du texte biblique: études d'histoire du texte offertes en hommage à Adrian Schenker
Editor:Goldman, Yohanan; Uehlinger, Christoph
Place:Fribourg, Suisse; Göttingen
Publisher:Ed. Univ.; Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht
Series:Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis 179
Keywords:

ID:163
Author:Duval, Danièle
Year:1992
Title:Salomon sage ou habile: Dans le Texte Massoretique et dans la Septante (1R 2,12-11,43 et 3R 2,12-11,43)
Pages:213-32
Journal:Revue des Sciences Religieuses
Volume:66
Keywords:

ID:164
Author:Eaton, Margaret
Year:1997
Title:The Intractable Servant of the Septuagint: Translating `ebed
Pages:114-22
Journal:Bible Translator
Volume:48
Issue:1
Abstract:Translators of the Septuagint did not apply the principle of stereotyping to `ebed but rendered it using four different Greek nouns: doulos, paides, oikeios, and pais. In Gen 9 and Lev 25, sensitive choice of words drew out implications within the Hebrew text, but in other places, nuances of the Hebrew were masked. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:Translation Technique

ID:165
Author:Ekblad, Eugene Robert
Year:1999
Title:Isaiah's servant poems according to the Septuagint : an exegetical and theological study
Place:Leuven
Publisher:Peeters
Keywords:Literary study--Individual book--Isaiah; Theology

ID:166
Author:Elliott, J. K.
Year:1996
Title:Manuscripts, the Codex and the Canon
Pages:105-23
Journal:Journal for the Study of the New Testament
Volume:63
Abstract:Analyzes the content of the most significant MSS of the NT and identifies the major differences between them regarding their contents and the sequences of the books they contain. One of the reasons why the NT canon became relatively firmly fixed from an early date was that Christians used the codex. For the OT the contents were far more fluid. Draws attention to the differences not only between the Hebrew and Alexandrian canons but also between the often fluctuating contents of the Hebrew, Syriac, Latin and Greek MSS of the OT. Shows how the main MSS, especially within the Greek tradition, have affected modern printed editions of the LXX. Includes a description of how varying traditions in Latin and Greek have influenced modern versions. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:

ID:167
Author:Epstein, Marcelo
Year:1994
Title:On the Original Septuagint
Pages:322-29
Journal:Bible Translator
Volume:45
Issue:3
Abstract:Ancient sources indicate there may have been older versions of the LXX. Fifteen discrepancies between the MT, LXX and Talmudic Hebrew manuscripts are evaluated. Origen claimed that the divine name was originally rendered by the Hebrew tetragrammaton, not kurios. Early papyri seem to confirm this view. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:History; Textual Criticism

ID:168
Author:Evans, T.V.
Year:2001
Title:Verbal syntax in the Greek Pentateuch : natural Greek usage and Hebrew interference
Place:Oxford
Publisher:Oxford University Press
Keywords:Pentateuch

ID:169
Author:Eynikel, Erik
Year:1999
Title:La lexicographie de la Septante: aspects methodologiques
Pages:134-49
Journal:Revue des Sciences Religieuses
Volume:73
Issue:2
Abstract:In the last decades the situation of LXX lexicography has changed considerably. During 170 years not a single dictionary of the LXX was produced. Now we possess several. Reflects on the following questions: (1) Which text edition should we use as a base for our lexicon; (2) which translation do we chose and how do we organize the sequence of translations offered; and (3) how do we fix the meaning of the Greek words? The last question is the most important and the most difficult. In most cases of the realia, the Greek of the LXX coincides with the use in contemporary Greek. However, some exceptions are of the essence: the stereotyped renditions, the etymological translations, neologism and polysemic words. In most of these cases the Greek words take the meaning of the underlying Hebrew words. (French) (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:LXX Lexicography

ID:170
Author:Eynikel, Erik; Hauspie, K.
Year:1997
Title:The Use of Kairos and Chronos in the Septuagint
Pages:369-85
Journal:Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses
Volume:73
Issue:4
Abstract:James Barr, in his book Biblical Words for Time (1962), was critical of several theologians who tried to distinguish between brute chronological time and the prepared moment. John A. T. Robinson had used a distinction of this sort in his book In the End God, as did J. Marsh in his book In the Fulness of Time, and Oscar Cullman in Christ and Time (1946). After examining use of the words for time in Greek papyri and again in the Septuagint, there is good reason to doubt whether Barr understood some of the distinctions that these writers had discovered. Favors the approach to kairos and chronos taken by Delling in the articles he wrote for Theological Wordbook of the New Testament. (c) Religious and Theological Abstracts
Keywords:LXX Lexicography--lemma


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